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Moderator of r/FrugalStickied post

Welcome to the weekly thread for sharing your finds, hauls, tips and tricks.

Whether actual thrift store finds, a haul from couponing, something you found and put to use, or just a life change you wanted to share, it belongs here.

Please be mindful of the rules when commenting,

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3 comments
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Moderator of r/FrugalStickied post

Welcome to the weekly thread for sharing your finds, hauls, tips and tricks.

Whether actual thrift store finds, a haul from couponing, something you found and put to use, or just a life change you wanted to share, it belongs here.

Please be mindful of the rules when commenting,

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41 comments
71

This gift exchange tradition comes from Iceland and it's called Jolabokaflod or "Yule Book Flood". My SO and I have adopted it for our own gift exchange. The only thing we give one another is a new book and a box of chocolate on Christmas Eve, then we stay in bed reading and eating. It takes a lot of stress away and is financially easy on the wallet.

You could always adjust this idea to anything, a new music record and cheese, new game and coffee. Whatever works for you two.

Just wanted to pass along this idea incase anyone needed it :). Happy Holidays!

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This is something that helped me a lot when transitioning from a very wasteful, spending money every single day life to a frugal life where I have over 10K in savings to pay off student loan debt while still in college.

I would go the the mall, $15. Get some lunch, $11. Put gas and get a snack, $27. Go to university, and get dinner uber eats $17.

When I got home and added it all up. Over $70 a day, I knew I had to make changes. It hit me like a bus because all I had after spending all that money was... well a full tank of gas (which is inevitable) and a new shirt. Everything else I could have made at home.

So I stuck with that motto and instead started realizing my wants vs my needs. What I wouldn’t spend I would start saving. And just as easy as it was for me to spend that money and be upset at the negative numbers, I save that money and am so happy to see the positive number!

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The following is not a question, just a musing.

I always been the most frugal person I know. (OK, well, until I discovered this subreddit. Some of you fellas beat me hands-down.) I am not necessarily frugal out of necessity. Generally I can afford to be not so frugal. So since I joined this subreddit I've been musing on the merits of frugality.

As one example, I drive a beat-up 2008 Toyota Corolla.

- It has never had a single problem in a decade. I've just done the regular oil changes and changed the tires once. Saving money and the time and hassle of fixing things.

- It has pretty good gas mileage.

- I pay a very low car insurance since I shopped around for half a day once a few years ago, and because the car is not worth much and it has low miles.

- I only need to keep it as clean as needed to avoid wear-and-tear. In other words I don't need to shine it each Saturday. I just clean it when it's really dirty or salty from the road. I will drive it til the wheels fall off.

What's not to like? But I realized that beyond the obvious reasons I like frugality generally and like this car specifically, is that frugality offers one other benefit:

I scraped the front bumper against a pole at the gas station a month ago, and the guy came running out looking all worried and frantically pointing and said he was so sorry I scraped my car. I calmly told him thanks for the concern, but hakuna matata. I felt nothing. I didn't care, one whit. I didn't even get out of my car to look at how bad the scrape was. (I don't scrape my car super often, so don't think I'm driving around trying to scrape all the time... the car has a few small dings and scratches and the paint is peeling, but it doesn't look like a complete beater...)

And that is the benefit. Frugality is liberating. If someone backed into me in a parking lot it would be a nuisance yes, but I wouldn't FEEL sad or angry. Now, what if I had a nice car? I'd always be worrying about not getting the slightest scratch on it. I'd be mad when someone did scratch it. I'd have this constant level of worry. For example when my kids open the door near a garage wall I'd have to quickly yell "watch the door" and/or feel that awful apprehension as I wait for the door to bash into the wall. There would be a constant background feeling of fear of loss. The car would feed my pride and my pride would constantly worry about the car. It's the same with most things I own: my homely but very inexpensive ($40 at a garage sale) LazyBoy couch+recliners in my living room. If my kids destroy it, so what? I'll get another one. It's the same with my $5 secondhand bike. It works fine other than rattling a bit. If it stops working one day, so what? It's the same with my secondhand $100 desktop computer I got 5 years ago; it's zippy and still works great (meanwhile my ex-wife insisted on the latest Macbook +software, with a price-tag of something like $2000 at the time. Then she ended up doing all her photo editing on my computer and most of her other stuff too). If it fizzles one day, so what? Everything is backed up in the cloud and I'll go buy another $100 used computer (selecting carefully, not just the first $100 computer I see of course!).

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We all know cooking your own food, and making your own coffee is the way to go. It's important to remember that your tools need to be sturdy.

We found that home appliances/tools such as blenders, spatulas, spoons, strainers, French press, kettle etc can seem affordable at first but break after only a few months.

They at first seemed pretty good but after heavy duty use, (meal prep) each broke way too quickly

For example we purchased a couple of immersion blender about $30 each but they broke in less than a year, after having spent over 60 on those we decided to buy a commercial grade immersion blender and it's been over a year and a half and it's still going strong and it was about $80.

We also buy spoons, tongs, knives, cutting boards. Etc at comercial kitchen supply stores we find that we only spend just a bit more than at dept stores, target or whatever but for something of much higher quality and last so much longer.

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I was able to checkout a pass to the state parks from my local library. It was a fun day of hiking in a beautiful area. I was curious if there are other things that you can checkout or do at your library that others may find useful?

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Community Details

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Members

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Mar 3, 2008

Cake Day

Frugality is the mental approach we each take when considering our resource allocations. It includes time, money, convenience, and many other factors.

r/Frugal Rules

1.
Be civil and respectful.
2.
Low effort, off topic, inane or crude content will be removed.
3.
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4.
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5.
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6.
Be descriptive, informative and clear when posting
7.
Reserve hauls and finds for the weekly thread.

Some guidelines

Posting

  • Be informative. If requesting advice, explain your situation as best you can so that users have something to work with.

  • If posting an image, make sure the title is informative and clear in how it relates to frugality, and ideally accompany it with a comment relevant to it.

  • If posting something you made, explain how or why you went about it, how much it cost, how much time it took, and share the recipe or materials needed.

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    Depending on the removal reason, posts and comments may be reinstated if edited.

    If you have questions about a removal or wish to request reinstatement, message the moderators.

Commenting

  • Everyone has their own definition of frugality, and reason for being frugal.

    Discuss and debate, but don't fight over it, or be condescending to those who do not share your particular view on frugality.

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  • Don't be baited into violating the rules. Report infractions and let the mods handle it.

  • Observe Reddiquette

Finance subs

r/cordcutters

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r/NoContract

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Lifestyle & Home subs

r/Anticonsumption

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Purchases

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r/BuyItForLife

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r/SuggestALaptop

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r/ThriftStoreHauls

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r/whatcarshouldIbuy

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