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Please read this entire post carefully and format your application appropriately.

This post is for new panelist recruitment! The previous one is here.

The panel is an informal group of redditors who are either professional scientists or those in training to become so. All panelists have at least a graduate-level familiarity within their declared field of expertise and answer questions from related areas of study. A panelist's expertise is summarized in a color-coded AskScience flair.

Membership in the panel comes with access to a panelist subreddit. It is a place for panelists to interact with each other, voice concerns to the moderators, and where the moderators make announcements to the whole panel. It's a good place to network with people who share your interests!


You are eligible to join the panel if you:

  • Are studying for at least an MSc. or equivalent degree in the sciences, AND,

  • Are able to communicate your knowledge of your field at a level accessible to various audiences.


Instructions for formatting your panelist application:

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This has bothered me for quite some time. I get that a lot of people died of diseases and such. Standing, stagnant water allways looks so disgusting. Was the ones who lived immune systems so much better or were they able to keep the cistern free of diseases using plants or something?

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So I know the plague was spread by rats but how did it get to such low rates and how long did it take to die down?

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I sometimes help tutor remedial introductory uni-physics, and someone asked this question and it honestly stumped me I couldn’t figure out an intuitive way to answer this basic question.

The student asked something like: “If you had a rocket ship that was travelling through space at 51% of the speed of light relative to earth and it had a smaller rocket ship on board and it shot off the second spaceship from its docking bay and the smaller rocket ship also accelerated itself to 51% the speed of light relative to the first ship. Wouldn’t the smaller rocket ship be travelling at 102% the speed of light relative to earth?”

I started talking about frames of reference but honestly, I can’t for the life of me figure out an intuitive way of explaining that. Pleas help.

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Trying to explain myself better, according to scientists, the matter that we can see, is not enough to hold the galaxies together, so there must be a matter that we don't see, that only interacts gravitationally with the "normal" matter. But as far as we know, do we have evidence that it is the dark matter that keeps the galaxies intact? Or could it be magic or the power of God or stuff like that, holding the galaxies together?

Sorry if my question seems stupid to you, and for my mistakes in writing English.

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I was watching a video on the LHC and this question popped into my mind that I couldn't find an answer to online.

Which is how the LHC in Geneva accounts for soil movement, expanding soils, and things like that, given that it's such a massive structure? Wouldn't it eventually throw their measurements off? I know they need a remarkable amount of precision to electromagnetically shoot particle beams into one another.

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